CD30 expression in specific tumor types

Science of CD30 focuses on cell surface expression of the antigen. Expression of CD30 is not clearly defined in most malignancies, and data are often from small series or case reports, particularly in solid tumors. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the cell surface expression of CD30.

The information presented here provides an overview of the current literature but is not an exhaustive review. New data and insights from new studies and reviews will be added as they become available.

Expression of CD30
Condition % of cases (N) % of cells Study
Hematologic Malignancies
Acute myeloid leukemia/granulocytic sarcoma 33 (3/9) + Fickers 19961
  6 (4/67) 22-26 Gattei 19972
Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 21 (3/14) Most cells Stein 19853
  23 (21/91) Highly variable Takeshita 19954
  12 (8/66) >30 Higuchi 20055
  19 (7/36) >10 Ohtsuka 19946
  8 (3/36) ≥60  
  11 (4/36) >10 but <60  
  14 (5/36) + but ≤10  
  0 (0/4) >10 Miyake 19947
Aggressive systemic mastocytosis/mast cell leukemia 85 (11/13)   Sotlar 20118
  Aggressive systemic mastocytosis 40 (2/5) 10-50  
  60 (3/5) >50  
  Mast cell leukemia 71 (5/7) Most >50  
Anaplastic large cell lymphoma All by definition Almost all in most variants; rare in small cell variant Delsol 20089
      Mason 200810
      Kinney 199311
Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 33 (4/12) ≥10 Stacchini 200712
  0 (0/42) <30 Went 200613
  0 (0/6) + Rüdiger 200214
  3 (3/104) + Lee 200315
Burkitt lymphoma 18 (3/17) + Jones 199516
Classical Hodgkin lymphoma 98.4 (1265/1286) ≥20 von Wasielewski 199717
  Nodular lymphocyte predominant
  Hodgkin lymphoma
7 (7/104) ≥20 von Wasielewski 199718
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 26 (30/114) Strong or partial Pallesen 199019
  21 (30/146) <50 Noorduyn 199420
  17 (25/146) >50
  4 (3/67) Weak Eow 200621
  7 (11/160) + Maes 200122
Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma 87 (20/23) 100 Murray 199523
  37.5 (Type 1: 38) + Delabie 201124
  12.5 (Type 2: 20) Few  
Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type 75 (15/20) Most >50 Pongpruttipan 201125
  48 (13/27) + Ko 200026
  41 (9/22) + Kuo 200427
  39 (36/92) + Au 200928
  35 (29/84) ≥10 Schwartz 200829
  21 (18/84) 10-50  
  13 (11/84) >50  
  31 (11/36) + Li 200630
  20 (3/15) Highly variable Gaal 200031
Follicular lymphoma 50 (11/22) Faint to intense Gardner 200132
  50 (7/14) + Noorduyn 199420
  14 (2/14) >50  
  36 (5/14) <50  
Lymphomatoid papulosis >75 Type A, C, D + Willemze 200533
  60 Type B + Kempf 201134
      El Shabrawi-Caelen 200435
Multiple myeloma 43 (3/7) 23-26 Gattei 19972
  13 (3/23) ≥10 Menke 199836
  Plasmacytoma 42 (5/12) ≥10  
  25 (1/4) >10 Miyake 19947
Mycosis fungoides Some large cells >50 Higgins 200837
  11 (12/113) >10 Talpur 200638
  Transformed MF 100 (6/6) 5->60 Edinger 200939
  53 (8/15) + Diamandidou 199840
  53 (9/17) ≥75 in 4 cases Barberio 200741
  41 (9/22) + Arulogun 200842
  31 (14/45) >75 in 7 cases Vergier 200043
  24 (4/17) 50-75 in 3 cases Cerroni 199244
Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified 32 (69/217) >20 Weisenburger 201145
  5 (15/331) ≥80 Savage 200846
  Lymphoepithelioid (Lennert) lymphoma 13 (2/16) + Weisenburger 201145
Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma All by definition >75 Willemze 200533
Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma 86 (62/72) Most 10-50 Pileri 200347
  81 (13/16) Variable Dunphy 200848
  69 (35/51) Most diffuse Higgins 199949
Solid Tumors
Breast cancer      
  ER-, PR- or Her2-positive 0 (0/210) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Triple-negative 6 (4/71) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Carcinoma of unknown primary origin 4 (1/27) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Gastrointestinal      
  Colorectal 0 (0/168) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Pancreatic carcinoma 30 (3/10) Diffuse Schwarting 198951
  0 (0/71) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  0 (0/11) + Lau 201052
  0 (0/2) + Pallesen 198853
  0 (0/5) + Millward 199854
  Esophageal 0 (0/28) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Cholangiocarcinoma 0 (0/21) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Hepatocellular carcinoma 0 (0/18) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Gastric 0 (0/18) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Anal 14 (1/7) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Gall bladder 0 (0/5) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Pancreatic, undifferentiated with
  osteoclastic giant cells
100 (1/1) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Genitourinary      
  Renal cell carcinoma 0 (0/42) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Bladder 0 (0/27) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Nonbladder, transitional cell 0 (0/3) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Nonbladder, squamous cell 100 (1/1) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Gynecologic      
  Ovarian 5 (9/173) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Endometrial 3 (1/29) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Cervical 0 (0/16) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Fallopian tube 0 (0/6) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Uterine 0 (0/5) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Carcinosarcoma 25 (1/4) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Head and neck carcinoma 0 (0/50) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Lung      
  Adenocarcinoma 25 (1/4) Weak, diffuse Schwarting 198951
  13 (2/15) + Garcia-Prats 199855
  0 (0/13) + Pallesen 198853
  0 (0/19) + Lau 201052
  0 (0/5) + Millward 199854
  0 (0/125) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Small cell 1 (1/71) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Squamous cell 2 (1/44) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Large cell 0 (0/8) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Mesothelioma 40 (16/40) Focal Garcia-Prats 199855
  28 (5/18) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  25 (2/8) Weak Dürkop 200056
  0 (0/4) + Pallesen 198853
  0 (0/10) + Lau 201052
  0 (0/3) + Millward 199854
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma 10.5 (4/38) 1-100 Kneile 200657
  0 (0/26)   Lau 201052
Neuroendocrine
  Carcinoid 0 (0/11) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Adrenocortical carcinoma 0 (0/1) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Other 0 (0/14) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Prostate 0 (0/48) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Sarcoma      
  Soft tissue sarcoma 0 (0/29) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Gastrointestinal stromal tumor 0 (0/8) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Rhabdomyosarcoma 33 (1/3) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Osteosarcoma 0 (0/3) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Chondrosarcoma 0 (0/3) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Ewing sarcoma 0 (0/3) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Skin      
  Melanoma 40 (2/5) Weak, diffuse Schwarting 198951
  9 (6/64) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  4 (1/24) Weak, variable Polski 199958
  0 (0/9) + Pallesen 198853
  0 (0/9) + Lau 201052
  0 (0/2) + Millward 199854
  Squamous cell 14 (1/7) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Merkel cell 0 (0/6) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Testicular      
  Embryonal carcinoma 100 (9/9) + Latza 199559
  100 (3/3) 5, 40, 95 Liu 201060
  98 (49/50) >50 Gopalan 200961
  96 (85/89) + Bode 201162
  94 (16/17) Most >75 Lau 201052
  94 (48/51) Almost all Dürkop 200056
  93 (13/14) + Lau 200763
  74 (14/19) >75 Suster 199864
  Mixed germ cell 17 (1/6) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Seminoma 0 (0/2) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Thymic 0 (0/13) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Thyroid      
  Papillary 0 (0/8) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Anaplastic 100 (1/1) ≥10 Sharman 201250
  Medullary 0 (0/1) ≥10 Sharman 201250
Tumors of mesenchymal origin 45 (41/91) Most cells Mechtersheimer 199065

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